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  • Top Tips for Business Success- Jill Chivers

     Name:                     Jill Chivers

     Business Name:    Shop Your Wardrobe

     Web Details:         www.shopyourwardrobe.com

     

     

     

    Top Tips for Business Success

    Interview with Jill Chivers from Shop your Wardrobe

    Natalie

    What inspired you to become an entrepeneur?”

    Jill

    “Well I didn’t really want to go into business for myself, really!  My first business was started reluctantly in 2001, when I was living in Sydney.  I was fortunate enough to achieve some early success and I gained my “stripes” as a small business person over a few years.  My first business was as an image consultant, and my second was as a corporate trainer and facilitator.  The Corporate Compass, the training and facilitation firm I founded in 2002, was very successful and I worked with high performing teams and senior leaders from some of the world’s biggest companies for many years. I now love being in business for myself!  I have a lot of freedom in terms of when I work and what I work on.  I have met some amazing people, and delivered some powerful and fascinating work for wonderful clients.  I’ve earned great money – more than I would as an employee.  It isn’t all beer and skittles, and there are aspects to being in business for yourself that can be a grind.”

    Natalie

    “What were some of your initial challenges (eg getting your message out there, publicity, finding direction, finding clients, money, budgetting)?”

    Jill

    I found it very hard to adjust to having my working day filled with variety and people – always surrounded by other people, to working at home on my own, with only my cat for company (no wonder she’s so neurotic – I talked to her constantly!).  I didn’t know enough to build support structures around me, and I floundered quite a lot due to isolation and loneliness.  I had no one to bounce ideas off, and no one who was invested in my business or success.  This is why networking, coaching/mentoring and mastermind groups are so powerful.  They aren’t to “get clients” as much as they are to provide a support structure around solopreneurs who would otherwise be quite isolated.

    I had other challenges way back then, too, to do with systems and processes.  I had to make everything up from scratch – everything from how to prepare a proposal, to creating invoices.  All of that took time and attention (and wasn’t fun, although it was necessary). “

    Natalie

    “What do you know now that you wish you knew back then?”

    Jill

    “All the women I have met through the Enlightened Goddesses Business Network”

    Natalie

    “Why do you think the NetConnect Seminar is always a huge success and why have you agreed to be involved?”

    Jill

    • There’s the “Natalie factor” – you make this event great, you set the tone, you set the stage, you make it great.
    • It’s a generous place to be – it’s about sharing, it’s about giving, it’s about being there for others.  It’s an expansive place to be.
    • It’s got a practical, ‘how to’ flavour to it.  Women can leave the event and have a clear sense of actions they can take that will make a difference to them – personally and/or in their business.
    • It’s got a lot of variety in it.  There’s a range of speakers on related but different topics, it has exhibitors with interesting and useful products, and it’s in a great location. It’s an interesting day!

    Natalie

    What are your 3 top tips to creating a successful solo business?”

    Jill

    1. Put some structures around you to provide you with support, inspiration and connection.  A networking group – one where you really connect – is a fabulous way of achieving this.  So is a mastermind group, where a small group of like-minded women get together every month (or so) to share their successes and challenges and seek support, inspiration and connection with one another.  Coaching/mentoring can also provide this.  However you do it – set yourself up to succeed by putting these structures in place. 
    2. Dedication is more important than passion.  It’s great to be enthusiastic about your business, and to feel you are fulfilling your purpose by bringing your business to life.  In the long term, though, your business will survive because you are dedicated to it, not because you are passionate about it.  Dedication is passion + commitment.  Dedication includes the enthusiasm, the love, you feel for your business AND it includes the consistent hard work, the daily doing (even when you don’t feel like it and doing the things you don’t like doing) that keeps your business alive.
    3. Be open to feedback.  We often feel protective about our businesses.  Sometimes we may even feel like they are our children, that we birthed them.  It’s great to love your business, but it will stultify and atrophy if you don’t receive feedback about key components of it.  Be discerning in who you ask for feedback (I don’t accept feedback from everyone, and I’m very careful from whom I ask it).  But when you ask for it, be open to it – let it in.  Don’t put up a shield to it or justify your decisions or explain why it is the way it is or why certain things can’t be changed.  Just let it in, and know that feedback is an opportunity to grow.  To become better, clearer, to lift your game to another level. Feedback is a gift.”

    Natalie

    “What satisfies you most about owning your  own business?”

    Jill

    I get a rush when someone gets something, and I’ve helped them to switch the light on.  The insight is all theirs, but something about the alchemy of us working together and the material I’ve provided has helped them get there.  That’s magic. I feel my main role is to shine a light for others to walk their own path.  It’s an honour to hold the light for someone else.”

    Natalie

    “Would you ever give it up? your own business? could you?”

    Jill

    “Being a soloist can be deeply fulfilling and enriching in every way. It’s challenging, often in ways you can’t imagine until you’re in it.   Because I love to collaborate with others, I can imagine a range of project-driven initiatives where I work closely with others, whilst still retaining some form of autonomy.  I can’t see myself  being fully employed by an organisation ever again.  But I can’t see into the future, and I’m looking forward to what this next phase of my life, and my business, brings.”

    You can meet Jill at NetConnect Seminar March 2012, where she will be sharing her tips for how to create FREE publicity for your business that works!  click here for more info.

     

     

    Published on February 4, 2012 · Filed under: Events, General;
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